BP, Subway, and Re-establishing My Routine


The hardest thing I've had to do since moving from California is re-establishing a writing routine.  Physically, moving has been hard but emotionally, it has been a minefield.

For years I've had a variety of places to burrow into.  Having writing space away from home was NOT. A. PROBLEM. 

When I was working, I would leave early and get an hour of writing in at House of Java.  When that place changed owners and changed names, I moved on to Cafe La Mo, Crust & Crumb, and Starbucks.  Any of those place, but most especially my beloved Cafe La Mo, provided me a quiet, friendly atmosphere for reading, writing, and daydreaming.   La Mo and C&C were favorite places for meeting up with friends and just talking and sipping a great cuppa.  And, inevitably afterward, there was a visit to my favorite shop, Digs, or a drop in at Charity Thrift Shop.  Without fail, there was something to separate me from my money and to happily carry home and add to my burgeoning collection of whatever.  I have a lot of collections.

But all that has changed now.  My new reality is very different.  It's simpler, choices are few and what I'm used to is now far away from my new home base.  If I was inclined to drive 30-40 minutes to enjoy a "California" mood,  I suppose I could.  But making that sort of choice would blind me to the new sort of beauty that surrounds me.  In a town that has more than its fair share of empty storefronts, block after block, in fact, it also has little corners of possibilities.  You just have to look a little harder to find them.  And like all hidden gems, the unusual and unexpected, the something rare, can easily be overlooked.

So here I am, sitting inside my newly found something rare - The Subway/British Petroleum Gas Station.  Oh yes.  I didn't stutter.  Subway/BP, my new hideaway.  I'm tucked into a corner, my laptop fired up and I'm feeling the words pouring out of me.   Outside the window is the levee that separates the town from the Mississippi River.  The soybean processing plant is nearby and barges pull in to haul their cargo down the river.  The Port of Caruthersville is maybe a mile way from the soybean plant and I have yet to discover what happens there but since this is a hardcore farming community, I'm guessing agriculture is very much involved.  

Inside I am looking at a mini- grocery geared towards gasoline, drinks, and snacks.  To my right is the Subway.  People come and go; few actually sit down (well today they don't, anyway).  T-shirts, jeans, and work clothes are the order of the day.  There isn't a hipster in sight.  I must admit to a strong sense of relief about that.  With the people here, what you see is what you get and I'm liking that a lot.

So, for now, this is my new home away from home.  They have an espresso machine that turns out a good latte and the clerks double as baristas.  Time for me to move on and pick up a grande vanilla latte, hot, with a sprinkle of cinnamon for Don who is patiently waiting at home for his shot of strength.




Comments

  1. Lovely. You are right, it is a new and different beauty and without a doubt your openness will lead to even more discovery <3

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    1. Love it that you reply on my blog, Erin. Many don't, mainly because they don't know what to do. **sigh**

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  2. I cannot BELIEVE this! This place is so un-Annie!!!

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    1. Yrs. Very different. But I'm am content, Ginny.

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  3. I always love reading what you write, I like seeing my hometown through new eyes. Yes you will learn a lot. I spied a cotton field not far from here. Be a god place for our next outing.

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  4. LOVE IT.... AND--I'll bet (if it's like our small town) that if you go to the Subway/BP early in the morning, a group of men (usually men) are meeting for breakfast and gossip...... ha ha ... OH--the joys of smalltown living.... I love it about 90% of the time... BUT--on occasion, I get a little upset when we have to drive an hour away to Knoxville to do certain things or buy certain things you cannot get in our town.... BUT--that is rare...

    Glad you are getting accustomed to country living......

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  5. I'm glad you are finding your spot, Annie. It's hard when you are uprooted, especially if you don't want your spot to be in your own home or the library. I've never really done that -- hauled the computer off to another spot to work but I can imagine it's disarming. I'm really glad the coffee is good!

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  6. Annie, I just want to tell you I am soooooooooo envious of you!

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  7. P.S. The mop tells a story in itself! :)

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    1. Hah. You noticed the mop. It was left there just as I started my pictures. It makes a nice touch, doncha think?

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  8. So glad you are finding new places to go and a new way of living. I always say it takes a year to readjust and you are doing just fine.

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    1. This is very reassuring, Marilyn. I have lots of time.

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